Category: Guidelines

The newly appointed Chair of the Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE), Charlotte Crosswell pledged to acknowledge and learn from past mistakes to help open banking deliver on its mission as a public good by increasing competition and innovation and ultimately securing better outcomes for consumers and SMEs.

Charlotte Crosswell, Chair of the Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE)

Crosswell’s appointment comes after Imran Gulamhuseinwala resigned as OBIE Trustee and Chair following an independent investigation commissioned by the CMA (Competition and Markets Authority). Having considered the findings, the CMA last week published the report and set out the next steps to be taken.

Crosswell is charged with leading the planned transition to the future arrangements for open banking. Further priority hires will be the appointment of new Non-Executive Directors to the OBIE board to give appropriate independent scrutiny and oversight. The OBIE will work with the CMA and CMA9 to put the appropriate measures in place surrounding their appointments.

Charlotte Crosswell, OBIE’s Chair said: “Firstly I want to thank everyone who contributed to the review and acknowledge that those must have been difficult conversations to have. On behalf of OBIE, I want to take this opportunity to sincerely apologise to anyone who feels negatively affected or let down by the issues identified in Ms White’s report. In my new role at OBIE, I am committed to turning these learnings into effective and meaningful change both in terms of stronger governance as well as a continued focus on employee values and wellbeing.

 As part of a transition from a contractor to employee model, the OBIE has already made some progress on overhauling its employment infrastructure; the implementation of employment policies and procedures, the establishment of a dedicated HR function and a Culture and Values Working Group. The sentiment conveyed to me by an overwhelming number of existing staff is that the OBIE of today is unrecognisable from the negative culture previously described. However, the observations and findings of Ms White mean that there is absolutely no scope for complacency. Under my leadership we will commit to working to ensure that there is no repetition of any failings and inadequacies, historical or otherwise. Simply put, what happened was unacceptable and can’t happen again. We intend to act swiftly and decisively. Non-Executive Directors will be appointed to the OBIE board as a priority, to provide appropriate independent scrutiny and oversight.

Ms Crosswell went on to explain that since joining the OBIE initially as Transition Lead earlier this year she has been hugely impressed with the professionalism, dedication and innovation of the OBIE team and the wider support of the open banking ecosystem.

 “OBIE personnel past and present have helped to establish the UK as a recognised world leader in open banking. 4 million consumers and small businesses in the UK now use services powered by open banking technology. Everyone that works for the OBIE believes in the mission and that has been powerful and inspiring to witness.

 With the CMA soon to announce next steps towards the model for the future governance of open banking we are at a key inflection point, and I hope this will give us greater clarity and enable us to implement fully the kind of leadership, governance and structure, alongside a supportive, diverse and inclusive culture, that is vital for a progressive and permanent organisation.” 

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For further information, please contact: press@openbanking.org.uk

Notes to Editors:

  1. Open banking enables consumers and SMEs to share their bank and credit card transaction data securely with trusted third parties who are then able to provide them with applications and services which save them time and money.
  1. Charlotte Crosswell OBE was appointed as Transition Lead at Open Banking Ltd earlier this year. Charlotte has been involved in capital markets and technology throughout her career – as CEO, Board Advisor and Non-Executive Director. She is the Former CEO of Innovate Finance, where she worked closely with Fintech entrepreneurs, government and regulators in addition to working on the Independent Strategic Review into UK Fintech that was published in February 2021. Charlotte also represents UK Fintech on the Department for International Trade’s Financial Services Trade Advisory Group.
  1. You can view Alison White’s report on the CMA’s website.
  1. The CMA announced the following steps that are being taken following the investigation:
  1. The open banking implementation phase will complete in 2022. The findings of the Alison White investigation will also be taken into consideration in relation to the future governance arrangements for OBIE, alongside responses received to the CMA consultation earlier this year. A further update on this will be published as a priority.

About Us

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is the entity set up by the CMA in 2016 to deliver open banking. Its trading name is Open Banking Limited.

The OBIE is governed by the CMA and funded by the CMA9 (Allied Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, Barclays, Danske, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, Natwest Group and Santander). Its works with the CMA 9, as well as challenger banks, financial technology companies, third party providers and consumer groups.

The OBIE’s role is to:

The Open Banking Implementation (OBIE) has today launched a consultation on version 3.1.9 of the OBIE Standard. This represents the next stage in the development of open banking in the UK.

This versions includes updates on:

The OBIE welcomes responses to the consultation from all interested parties. The consultation process will take place between the 16th August and 3rd September 2021.

  1. The OBIE is hosting a webinar on Tuesday, 24th August at 13:00, to talk through v3.1.9 artefacts and explain the consultation process in more detail. If you wish to join this session, please register via Eventbrite here.
  2. Written consultation responses are due by midday on 3rd September 
  3. Please submit one response per organisation for each artefact.
  4. Responses are deemed to be non-confidential.
  5. Consultation responses will be reviewed, and the responses published, before the September Implementation Entity Steering Group meeting

Links to the draft version 3.1.9 of the OBIE Standard & feedback pages

 API specification

ASPSP MI Specifications & Change Log

TPP MI Specifications & Change Log

Customer Experience Guidelines & Change Log

Guidance for TPPs on use of VRPs for sweeping

Feedback pages

In addition to the above we would like to inform the ecosystem that we have updated the Variable Recurring Payment Proposition to include the agreed definition of Sweeping.

If you experience any issues accessing any of these links, please raise a ticket via the Service Desk Portal (if you have access)

https://openbanking.atlassian.net/servicedesk/customer/portal/1 or email the ServiceDesk@openbanking.org.uk and we can organise access.

All other queries can be directed to press@openbanking.org.uk

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For further information, please contact: press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

Open banking is a new, secure way for customers to take control of their financial data and share it with organisations other than their banks. Open banking has the power to revolutionise the way we move, manage and make more of our money. For businesses, it is about making the management of cash flow and receiving payments cheaper and easier. Open banking will make things simpler, faster and more convenient.

The OBIE follows the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) investigation into the supply of personal current accounts (PCAs) and of banking services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

The OBIE was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition in UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will enable developers to harness technology, making it easy and safe for individuals and SMEs to share the financial information held by their banks with third parties.

Open banking will bring substantial benefits. It gives customers and SMEs greater market choice and greater control over their money and associated data, along with better and easier access to new financial services providers in a secure environment.

Notes to Editors:

The OBIE was set up by the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) in September 2016 to fulfil one of the remedies mandated by the CMA following an investigation into UK retail banking.

The CMA’s investigation into the retail banking market (whose findings were published in August 2016) concluded that older and larger banks do not compete hard enough for customers’ business and that open banking should deliver a new, secure option for customers to be able to compare the deal they are getting from their bank.

The OBIE was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition to UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will make it easy and safe for customers to share their financial records by January 2018.

The data provided by open banking will enable developers to harness technology that allows individuals and businesses to share their financial records held by their banks with third parties.

The OBIE is a private body; its governance, composition and budget was determined by the CMA. It is funded by the UK’s nine largest current account providers and overseen by the CMA, the Financial Conduct Authority and Her Majesty’s Treasury.

The 9 mandated institutions (referred to as the CMA9) are: Barclays plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, Santander, Danske, HSBC, RBS, Bank of Ireland, Nationwide and AIBG.

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is delighted to learn that the CMA has decided, in line with the Trustee’s recommendations to mandate Variable Recurring Payments (VRPs) as the mechanism for implementing sweeping.

The CMA today published a letter to the Implementation Trustee that stated: “Making effective provision for sweeping is an important element of the open banking remedy and it is important that sweeping provisions include the ability to move funds out of current accounts into accounts earning a higher rate of interest, and conversely enables customers to access alternative and cheaper sources of short-term credit.”

Simply put, sweeping is the automatic transfer of money between a customer’s own accounts, such as moving excess funds into a separate savings account or using them to repay a loan or overdraft account.

VRPs allow customers to safely connect authorised payments providers to their bank account so that they can make payments on the customer’s behalf within agreed parameters that offer more control and transparency than existing alternatives.

This decision means that the largest UK current account providers will have to implement VRPs within the next six months and allow free access to third party providers who are using VRPs to enable their customers to move money from their current accounts to other accounts.

Commenting on the CMA’s decision, OBIE’s Implementation Trustee Imran Gulamhuseinwala OBE said:

“The CMA’s decision in line with OBIE’s advice, is a win for competition and innovation, which will deliver significant benefits to consumers and small businesses. We’ve been anticipating a decision from the CMA on this for some time now and have been on standby to implement this by the end of this year. The OBIE will now mandate Variable Recurring Payments for the purpose of sweeping, which is the automatic movement of money between an account holder’s different accounts. We like to think of it as the smarter version of direct debit payments.

This is a major step forward in payments, giving consumers more control over their money whilst also protecting them from incurring unwanted fees. It will, for example, allow surplus money to be automatically transferred from a current account to a savings account to help build a savings pot or to an overdraft or loan account to help the customer keep their borrowing costs to a minimum.

We are especially delighted as this is the last major piece of functionality to be delivered under the CMA’s open banking remedies. Over the past five years, we have built a thriving open banking ecosystem that already benefits nearly 4 million people and is growing rapidly. We look forward to the outcome of the CMA’s consultation on the future governance of open banking, which we hope will allow us to continue delivering world-leading innovation to the benefit of consumers, SMEs and the industry.”

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For further information, please contact: press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is the entity set up by the CMA in 2016 to deliver open banking. Its trading name is Open Banking Limited.

The OBIE is governed by the CMA and funded by the CMA9 (Allied Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, Barclays, Danske, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, Natwest Group and Santander). Its works with the CMA 9, as well as challenger banks, financial technology companies, third party providers and consumer groups. The OBIE’s role is to:

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) today publishes two documents following the conclusion of the second phase of its consultation on Variable Recurring Payments (VRPs) and Sweeping.

These documents are:

  1. VRP and Sweeping User Research Final Report
  2. Phase II Feedback Summary and OBIE Response Paper

This consultation process was started in November 2020.  Feedback from the first phase was published in January 2021.

Following this consultation process, the OBIE published version 3.1.8 of its Open Banking Standard, which includes VRP functionality. The OBIE will conclude its evaluation of Sweeping in the Summer of 2021.

 

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For further information, please contact: press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is the entity set up by the CMA in 2016 to deliver open banking. Its trading name is Open Banking Limited.

The OBIE is governed by the CMA and funded by the CMA 9 (Allied Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, Barclays, Danske, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, Natwest Group and Santander). Its works with the CMA 9, as well as challenger banks, financial technology companies, third party providers and consumer groups. The OBIE’s role is to:

 

 

Version 3.1.8 of the OBIE Standard introduces major new functionality, specifically Variable Recurring Payments (VRPs).

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is pleased to announce the publication of Version 3.1.8. of the OBIE Standard. This is a significant enhancement to version 3.1.7, which was released in December 2020. While it does not introduce any breaking changes (hence it remains technically a patch release), it does include the addition of VRP functionality.

VRPs are an emerging and novel way for customers to securely instruct and manage payments via open banking.

Customers can provide consent to a Payment Initiation Service Provider (PISP) for a series of payments, without the need for the customer to authenticate each individual payment with their bank or account provider.

VRPs, therefore, open up new forms of financial automation, improved end-user experiences, and greater levels of consumer transparency and control.

For firms looking to implement this latest version of the OBIE standard, please see the following links for further details:

 

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For further information, please contact: press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is the entity set up by the CMA in 2016 to deliver open banking. Its trading name is Open Banking Limited.

The OBIE is governed by the CMA and funded by the CMA 9 (Allied Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, Barclays, Danske, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, Natwest Group and Santander). Its works with the CMA 9, as well as challenger banks, financial technology companies, third party providers and consumer groups. The OBIE’s role is to:

 

 

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) has published version 3.1.7 of the ASPSP Management Information (MI) Specification.

Since publishing v3.1.5 of the ASPSP MI specification on 31 June 2020, ecosystem participants have raised a number of support ticket seeking clarification on various aspects of these specifications.

The changes resulting from these tickets have fixed minor inconsistencies and updated metric definitions to improve understanding by implementers. The detailed change can be located in the MI requirement link below.

This specification was initially approved by the Technical Design Authority on 13 January 2021 and recorded as TDA Decision 230.

It was subsequently approved by the Trustee at the Implementation Entity Steering Group meeting on 27 January 2021. The specification which can be accessed via link below.

Version 3.1.7 ASPSP MI Standard

Enrolled ecosystem participants are encouraged to contact their IES Team representatives with any questions or queries regarding the version 3.1.7. update.
All other queries can be directed to press@openbanking.org.uk.

 

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For further information, please contact:

press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

Open Banking is a new, secure way for customers to take control of their financial data and share it with organisations other than their banks. Open Banking has the power to revolutionise the way we move, manage and make more of our money. For businesses, it is about making the management of cash flow and receiving paymes cheaper and easier. Open Banking will make things simpler, faster and more convenient.

Open Banking follows the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) investigation into the supply of personal current accounts (PCAs) and of banking services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition in UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will enable developers to harness technology, making it easy and safe for individuals and SMEs to share the financial information held by their banks with third parties.

Open Banking will bring substantial benefits. It gives customers and SMEs greater market choice and greater control over their money and associated data, along with better and easier access to new financial services providers in a secure environment.

Notes to Editors:

  1. Open Banking Ltd was set up by the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) in September 2016 to fulfil one of the remedies mandated by the CMA following an investigation into UK retail banking.
  2. The CMA’s investigation into the retail banking market (whose findings were published in August 2016) concluded that older and larger banks do not compete hard enough for customers’ business and that Open Banking should deliver a new, secure option for customers to be able to compare the deal they are getting from their bank.
  3. Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition to UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will make it easy and safe for customers to share their financial records by January 2018.
  4. The data provided by Open Banking will enable developers to harness technology that allows individuals and businesses to share their financial records held by their banks with third parties.
  5. Open Banking is a private body; its governance, composition and budget was determined by the CMA. It is funded by the UK’s nine largest current account providers and overseen by the CMA, the Financial Conduct Authority and Her Majesty’s Treasury.
  6. The 9 mandated institutions (referred to as the CMA9) are: Barclays plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, Santander, Danske, HSBC, RBS, Bank of Ireland, Nationwide and AIBG.

 

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) has today published its consultation on Confirmation of Payee (CoP) and the Contingent Reimbursement Model (CRM) Code and its implications for open banking payment journeys.

The OBIE welcomes stakeholder views on the CoP / CRM Consultation paper via its online Consultation Survey.

  1. CoP/ CRM Consultation paper
  2. CoP and CRM Proposition paper
  3. CoP CRM Implications for OBIE R/W API Standards

A further Preliminary Analysis paper is also being published, which sets out in more detail the preliminary findings from the consumer research commissioned exploring the effectiveness of warnings. This supplements the summary of findings presented in the Consultation Paper.

The primary focus of our consultation is the content set out in the Consultation Paper. However, we have also produced a Draft Proposition Paper and an outlining of the potential implications for the API specification. We welcome observations on the recommendations set out in these too, via the relevant Confluence Feedback pages detailed below.

Consultation Process

If you experience any issues accessing any of these links, please raise a ticket via the Service Desk Portal (if you have access) https://openbanking.atlassian.net/servicedesk/customer/portal/1 or email the ServiceDesk@openbanking.org.uk and we can organise access.

 

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About the Open Banking Implementation Entity:

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is the entity set up by the CMA in 2016 to deliver Open Banking. Its trading name is Open Banking Limited. OBIE is governed by the CMA and funded by the CMA9 (Allied Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, Barclays, Danske, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, RBS Group and Santander). Its works with the CMA 9, as well as challenger banks, financial technology companies, third party providers and consumer groups.

OBIE’s role is to:

 

 

 

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is pleased to announce the publication of the Open Banking Standard, version 3.1.1.

This is a minor update to version 3.1 which was released in November 2018.

Based on feedback from participants within the ecosystem, and latest regulatory references, this version provides clarifications to previous versions and introduces the following enhanced functionality, guidelines and features (arising from approved change requests) to enable further PSD2 compliance:

– CR48 – Statement of Fees
– CR50 – Interest rate not found for non PCA products
– CR52 – Changes to SO frequency
– CR64 – Increase in Transaction ID length
– CR65 – Include Account Holder Name(s)

There are 2 core elements to this version:

In summary, this latest version enables a solution that can deliver further compliance with PSD2 and RTS.

Implementation is expected by 13th September, to align with PSD2 timelines.

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For further information, please contact:

press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

Open Banking is a new, secure way for customers to take control of their financial data and share it with organisations other than their banks. Open Banking has the power to revolutionise the way we move, manage and make more of our money. For businesses, it is about making the management of cashflow and receiving payments cheaper and easier. Open Banking will make things simpler, faster and more convenient.

Open Banking follows the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) investigation into the supply of personal current accounts (PCAs) and of banking services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition in UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will enable developers to harness technology, making it easy and safe for individuals and SMEs to share the financial information held by their banks with third parties.

Open Banking will bring substantial benefits. It gives customers and SMEs greater market choice and greater control over their money and associated data, along with better and easier access to new financial services providers in a secure environment.

Notes to Editors:

1. Open Banking Ltd was set up by the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) in September 2016 to fulfil one of the remedies mandated by the CMA following an investigation into UK retail banking.

2. The CMA’s investigation into the retail banking market (whose findings were published in August 2016) concluded that older and larger banks do not compete hard enough for customers’ business and that Open Banking should deliver a new, secure option for customers to be able to compare the deal they are getting from their bank.

3. Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition to UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will make it easy and safe for customers to share their financial records by January 2018.

4. The data provided by Open Banking will enable developers to harness technology that allows individuals and businesses to share their financial records held by their banks with third parties.

5. Open Banking is a private body; its governance, composition and budget was determined by the CMA. It is funded by the UK’s nine largest current account providers and overseen by the CMA, the Financial Conduct Authority and Her Majesty’s Treasury.

6. The 9 mandated institutions (referred to as the CMA9) are: Barclays plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, Santander, Danske, HSBC, RBS, Bank of Ireland, Nationwide and AIBG.

 

There are four significant changes taking place in March in relation to the UK’s Open Banking project and PSD2, the European legislation aimed at increasing pan-European competition and participation in the payments industry.

Adoption of the Open Banking Standard

Firstly, the managed roll out of the latest version of the Open Banking Standard begins this month from the mandated 9 banks (CMA9).

To be specific, this means that the CMA9 are now in the process of uplifting their production APIs to version 3.1 of the Read/Write API Specifications for both personal and business current accounts. This managed roll out is expected to take place over the next month, and will include the implementation of Mobile App authentication. The introduction of Mobile App authentication is expected to deliver a significant improvement to customer experience as well as accelerate customer adoption of both account information and payment initiation services. Importantly, this is also a significant step towards achieving full PSD2 implementation across the mandated banks and building societies.

Introduction of eIDAS Certificates

The Open Banking Directory (https://www.openbanking.org.uk/providers/directory/) has been further developed and upgraded and is now able to auto-enrol regulated entities via an API through the use of eIDAS certificates. Other enhancements include the introduction of APIs for all Directory services, which will facilitate automation for discovery, on-boarding and certificate/key management.

Testing Facility Open to Third Parties

All Account Providers in the UK and Europe who are applying to their Competent Authority for a ‘fallback exemption’ are required to make their API testing facility available to third parties. The regulatory requirements for these facilities (or “Sandboxes”) are explained in detail in the Operational Guidelines we have produced (https://www.openbanking.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Operational-Guidelines.pdf). This further supports the journey towards PSD2 compliance, enabling third parties to develop and test their propositions prior to launch across other account providers and for all PSD2 in-scope accounts.

Managed Conversion and Launch Assistance Programme

We have begun the roll out of our Managed Conversion and Launch Assistance (MCLA) programme. This is a managed service for all account providers and third parties enrolled with OBIE, designed to help facilitate testing, using either production APIs (i.e. live proving) and/or testing facilities (i.e. pre-live testing). This is a critical service which should speed up the growth of the ecosystem and deliver better outcomes for all Open Banking participants, and ultimately end customers.

Imran Gulamhuseinwala OBE, Trustee of the Open Banking Implementation Entity, said:

“The initiatives outlined above will further accelerate the potential Open Banking has to revolutionise the way people move, manage and make more of their money. Whilst the changes outlined above are technical in nature, they are strategically significant in the importance they will play in ultimately providing people with great new products and services, supported by enhanced customer experience. There are some important features due to be launched in due course, including biometric authentication, which we believe will make Open Banking even easier for customers whilst equally as secure. However, not all the banks are able to move at the same pace in launching these features and consequently I am now in discussions with the CMA regarding the appropriate action to take against those banks who will miss agreed delivery dates as detailed on the Roadmap.”

“However, as we enter the final six months of our delivery programme, we remain excited by the growth and maturity we see emerging across the global ecosystem and the commitment shown by the diverse players who are working powerfully together to fully optimise this transformative opportunity.”

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For further information, please contact:

press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

Open Banking is a new, secure way for customers to take control of their financial data and share it with organisations other than their banks. Open Banking has the power to revolutionise the way we move, manage and make more of our money. For businesses, it is about making the management of cashflow and receiving payments cheaper and easier. Open Banking will make things simpler, faster and more convenient.

Open Banking follows the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) investigation into the supply of personal current accounts (PCAs) and of banking services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition in UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will enable developers to harness technology, making it easy and safe for individuals and SMEs to share the financial information held by their banks with third parties.

Open Banking will bring substantial benefits. It gives customers and SMEs greater market choice and greater control over their money and associated data, along with better and easier access to new financial services providers in a secure environment.

Notes to Editors:

1. Open Banking Ltd was set up by the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) in September 2016 to fulfil one of the remedies mandated by the CMA following an investigation into UK retail banking.

2. The CMA’s investigation into the retail banking market (whose findings were published in August 2016) concluded that older and larger banks do not compete hard enough for customers’ business and that Open Banking should deliver a new, secure option for customers to be able to compare the deal they are getting from their bank.

3. Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition to UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will make it easy and safe for customers to share their financial records by January 2018.

4. The data provided by Open Banking will enable developers to harness technology that allows individuals and businesses to share their financial records held by their banks with third parties.

5. Open Banking is a private body; its governance, composition and budget was determined by the CMA. It is funded by the UK’s nine largest current account providers and overseen by the CMA, the Financial Conduct Authority and Her Majesty’s Treasury.

6. The 9 mandated institutions (referred to as the CMA9) are: Barclays plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, Santander, Danske, HSBC, RBS, Bank of Ireland, Nationwide and AIBG.

Guidelines for Read/Write Participants Updates

The Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) has updated its Guidelines for Read/Write Participants to provide additional guidance to Participants operating within the Open Banking Ecosystem.

This update includes guidance for Participants on testing of applications and utilisation of OBIE test tools, reference to the EBA final report on guidelines on the security measures for operational and security risks of payment services under PSD2, and other minor amendments.

The Guidelines for Read/Write Participants has been updated from v3.0 to v3.1.


For further information, please contact:

press@openbanking.org.uk

About Us

Open Banking is a new, secure way for customers to take control of their financial data and share it with organisations other than their banks. Open Banking has the power to revolutionise the way we move, manage and make more of our money. For businesses, it is about making the management of cashflow and receiving payments cheaper and easier. Open Banking will make things simpler, faster and more convenient.

Open Banking follows the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) investigation into the supply of personal current accounts (PCAs) and of banking services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition in UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will enable developers to harness technology, making it easy and safe for individuals and SMEs to share the financial information held by their banks with third parties.

Open Banking will bring substantial benefits. It gives customers and SMEs greater market choice and greater control over their money and associated data, along with better and easier access to new financial services providers in a secure environment.

Notes to Editors:

1. Open Banking Ltd was set up by the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) in September 2016 to fulfil one of the remedies mandated by the CMA following an investigation into UK retail banking.

2. The CMA’s investigation into the retail banking market (whose findings were published in August 2016) concluded that older and larger banks do not compete hard enough for customers’ business and that Open Banking should deliver a new, secure option for customers to be able to compare the deal they are getting from their bank.

3. Open Banking was created to enable innovation, transparency and competition to UK financial services. It is tasked with delivering the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), data structures and security architectures that will make it easy and safe for customers to share their financial records by January 2018.

4. The data provided by Open Banking will enable developers to harness technology that allows individuals and businesses to share their financial records held by their banks with third parties.

5. Open Banking is a private body; its governance, composition and budget was determined by the CMA. It is funded by the UK’s nine largest current account providers and overseen by the CMA, the Financial Conduct Authority and Her Majesty’s Treasury.

6. The 9 mandated institutions (referred to as the CMA9) are: Barclays plc, Lloyds Banking Group plc, Santander, Danske, HSBC, RBS, Bank of Ireland, Nationwide and AIBG.